Seminars in 2014-2015

List of seminars

 

Date: March 4th, 2015

Speakers

Karim Trabelsi (Oxfam)
Achref Aouadi (I-Watch)
Mohamed Dhia Hammemi (Independent researcher /journalist)

Topic: Addressing Inequality in Tunisia: Public Finances and Resource Allocation.

Time: 1:30pm

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Date: April 16th, 2015

Speaker: Fawaz A. Gerges is Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and holder of the Emirates Professorship in Contemporary Middle East Studies. He was also the inaugural Director of the LSE Middle East Centre from 2010 until 2013. He earned a doctorate from Oxford University and M.Sc. from the London School of Economics. Gerges has taught at Oxford, Harvard, and Columbia, and was a research scholar at Princeton and the chairholder of the Christian A. Johnson Chair in Middle Eastern Studies and International Affairs at Sarah Lawrence College, New York. His special interests include Islam and the political process, social movements, including mainstream Islamist movements and jihadist groups (like the Muslim Brotherhood and Al Qaeda), Arab politics and Muslim politics in the 20th century, the international relations of the Middle East, the Arab-Israeli conflict, state and society in the Middle East, American foreign policy towards the Muslim world, the modern history of the Middle East, history of conflict, diplomacy and foreign policy, and historical sociology.

Topic: American foreign policy towards the middle east: change and continuity?

Abstract: Currently Japan has been suffering from shrinking domestic industries during the period of the prolonged economic stagnation, and growing government debt along with increasing old aged population. On the other hand, Tunisian economy faces many challenges since the mid-1990s as a consequence of concluding a free trade agreement with the EU. Industrial modernization through upgrading productivity and competitiveness of domestic industries for the expansion of production and export as well as job creation for increasing working age population are current issues after the revolution in particular.
Reviewing factors and mechanism of economic development of Japan from historical perspectives, the objective of this presentation is to identify similarities and differences regarding macroeconomic conditions, structure of comparative advantage and sources of growth between Japan and Tunisia, in order to find implications to Tunisia. Based on the lessons learned from Japan’s rapid growth to stagnation to recovery in the context of East Asian experience, pros and cons of government intervention to market and role of visible hand for sustainable economic growth are discussed. As an example of upgrading and revitalization of domestic industries, challenges for development of olive oil sector and possible collaboration for its promotion between Tunisia and Japan are presented.

Time: 1:30pm

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Date: April 17th, 2015

Speaker: Kenichi KASHIWAGI, Ph.D. from the University of Tsukuba in Japan.

Topic: What Lessons can be Learned from Rapid Growth to Stagnation of Japan’s Economy?: Implications to Tunisia.

Abstract: Currently Japan has been suffering from shrinking domestic industries during the period of the prolonged economic stagnation, and growing government debt along with increasing old aged population. On the other hand, Tunisian economy faces many challenges since the mid-1990s as a consequence of concluding a free trade agreement with the EU. Industrial modernization through upgrading productivity and competitiveness of domestic industries for the expansion of production and export as well as job creation for increasing working age population are current issues after the revolution in particular.
Reviewing factors and mechanism of economic development of Japan from historical perspectives, the objective of this presentation is to identify similarities and differences regarding macroeconomic conditions, structure of comparative advantage and sources of growth between Japan and Tunisia, in order to find implications to Tunisia. Based on the lessons learned from Japan’s rapid growth to stagnation to recovery in the context of East Asian experience, pros and cons of government intervention to market and role of visible hand for sustainable economic growth are discussed. As an example of upgrading and revitalization of domestic industries, challenges for development of olive oil sector and possible collaboration for its promotion between Tunisia and Japan are presented.

Time: 1:30pm

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